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Lt. Col. Rafael Candelario II, commanding officer, 3rd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, observes his battalion's pass in review during the deactivation ceremony of D Company "Dragoons" aboard the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif., Feb. 09, 2018. D Company was deactivated by order of the Commandant of the Marine Corps after 32 years of service. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Preston L. Morris)

Photo by Lance Cpl. Preston Morris

"Dragoons" makes final pass in review

9 Feb 2018 | Lance Cpl. Preston Morris Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms

MARINE CORPS AIR GROUND COMBAT CENTER TWENTYNINE PALMS, Calif. – D Company, 3rd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, also known as “Dragoons”, was officially deactivated during a ceremony at Lance Cpl. Torrey L. Gray Field aboard the Combat Center, Feb. 9, 2018.

The decision to deactivate Dragoons was made courtesy of Marine Corps Bulletin 5400, which directed 3rd LAR to deactivate D Company no later than Sept. 30th, 2018 under the order of the Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. Robert B. Neller..

During the ceremony, Dragoons made a final pass in review and retired their guidon. Lt. Col. Rafael Candelario II, commanding officer, 3rd LAR, addressed Marines and attendees at the conclusion of the ceremony. Music for the ceremony was provided by the 1st Marine Division Band, under the direction of Chief Warrant Officer 3 Stephanie Wire.

“It is a sad day that we must retire Dragoons,” Candelario said. “But one day, we will reactivate Dragoons, and when war comes, we will be ready.”

The guidon for D Company was placed in a glass case inscribed “in case of war, break glass” which will hang in the Wolves Den at the 3rd LAR building. The display comes complete with a hammer with which to smash the glass in the event Dragoons is called upon to fight our nation’s battles once again.

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Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms