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Lt. Gen. William M. Faulkner, deputy commandant, installations and logistics, visited the Marine Corps Logistics Operations Group to talk to students in the Intermediate (Marine Air Ground Task Force) Logistics Operation Course about the future of Marine Corps logistics, Feb. 25, 2014. Faulkner answered questions from students regarding the changes in their field.

Photo by Cpl. D. J. Wu

Lt. Gen. Faulkner visits MCLOG, logisticians

25 Feb 2014 | Cpl. D.J. Wu

Lt. Gen. William M. Faulkner, deputy commandant, installations and logistics, visited the Marine Corps Logistics Operations Group to talk to students in the Intermediate (Marine Air Ground Task Force) Logistics Operation Course about the future of Marine Corps logistics, Feb. 25, 2014.

The members of the class, consisting of logistics operations officers and chiefs serving at the battalion and regimental level, attend IMLOC to become better logisticians for the Corps of tomorrow. The students asked Faulkner questions regarding the Corps moving forward and how their duties would change in the coming years.

“The lieutenant general is the advocate for the entire Marine Corps logistics community,” said Capt. Robert Jankowski, IMLOC course chief, MCLOG, “He’s giving the logistics chiefs and officers here an idea of what to expect in the logistics community.”

IMLOC is a relatively new class. Since its inception, only four iterations have graduated, and it is constantly evolving to suit the needs of the changing occupational field. The course and MCLOG as a whole are designed to set the doctrinal standard on how the logistics fields operate in the Marine Corps. They aim to prepare logisticians for the future of the field. Faulkner’s visit reinforces those principles and clarifies some to the concerns students may have.

“His wealth of knowledge is truly impressive,” said Capt. Justine Whipple, sports operations officer, Headquarters Marine Corps Semper Fit. “His answers to the questions were expected but he also addressed the fact that the logistics community is up and coming and we are a valuable asset to the Marine Corps.”

The logistics community is focusing their efforts in extracting assets out of Afghanistan and updating their doctrine. The end of Operation Enduring Freedom has put a lot of pressure on Marine Corps logistics. Marines, operating locations and equipment all have to be considered in the plan to either decommission or be brought back. Many Marine Corps orders and doctrines regarding logistics are outdated. MCLOG and education is part of the process.

“(Faulkner) brings a level of viability of all issues affecting logisticians all across the MAGTF,” Jankowski said. “He talked about where we are right now and where we are going in the future as far as facilities and the draw-down in Afghanistan, and the students had the opportunity to ask specific questions regarding the field.”

The main goal of the visit was to give the students awareness of the broader spectrum of their specialties. There are many aspects of the logistics that fall outside of the Logistics Combat Element and coordinating between the two is something they need to work on, according to Faulkner.

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