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Joshua McGlone, maintenance chief, 1st Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, meets his son, Jethro McGlone for the first time during 1/7’s homecoming at barracks 1403 and 1404 aboard the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, Calif., Oct. 14, 2017. The Marines had not seen their families for more than six months since being deployed and for some Marines this was the first time they held their children.

Photo by Lance Cpl. Natalia Cuevas

Families, friends welcome 1/7 Marines home

13 Oct 2017 | Lance Cpl. Natalia Cuevas Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms

Families and friends welcomed Marines home during the 7th Marine Regiment’s homecoming at Barracks 1403 and 1404 aboard the Combat Center, Oct. 13 and 14, 2017. The Marines had not seen their families for more than six months since being deployed and for some Marines this was the first time they held their children.

The Marines arrived in two groups, the first on Friday afternoon and the second on Saturday evening. Upon arrival to the installation the Marines went to the armory to clean their rifles and turn them in. Shortly after, the Marines arrived at the barracks where they were greeted with open arms by families and friends.

“Our mission is to raise the morale of America’s troops and their families,” said Teresa Cherry, center manager, Palm Springs United Service Organizations. “There is no better way to do that than to welcome the Marines home.”

The USO often comes to the Combat Center to provide services for departing and homecoming Marines and it was no different for the arrival of the 1/7 service members. Prior to their arrival the families of the Marines and sailors were provided snacks and refreshments courtesy of the USO as they awaited their loved ones’ return.

According to Maj. Brandon Stibb, battalion executive officer, 1/7, the Marines conducted pre-deployment training aboard the Combat Center before they deployed for six months rendering them unable to see their loved ones for nearly a year.

“For some of the Marines this will be the first time they will see their newborns,” Stibb said. “There are a lot of emotions during events like this and it’s important to the Marines and sailors to have the support of their loved ones.”

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Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms