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A Marine training with the Combat Center’s Advisor Training Group signals to his vehicle to pull forward while setting up for convoy operations Sept. 27 here. The motorized operations course is a live-fire training event. (Photo by: Lance Cpl. M. C. Nerl)

Photo by Lance Cpl. M. C. Nerl

Advisor Training Group trains Combat Center road warriors for Afghanistan's rough terrain

1 Oct 2010 | Lance Cpl. M. C. Nerl

Mounted and dismounted patrols and movements are some of the most common methods Marines in Afghanistan use to get around.

The Combat Center’s Advisor Training Group held a motorized operation event to evaluate standard operating procedures and tactics of teams training with them through a live-fire training evolution.

“They haven’t had a chance to work together on this as a team,” said Capt. Jimmy Lindemann, an officer tactics instructor with ATG. “The run of the course they get is a practical application of what they learned in [prior] training.”

The teams struggle with properly coordinating within themselves when learning to move and shoot for the first time.

“During the live fire course, the big problems we see are internal communication and practicing the concept of fire and movement,” said Lindemann, a Rosenberg, Texas, native. “If the exercise allows, we try to teach, coach and mentor as we move, but we always take copious notes to give them a thorough debrief afterwards.”

Corporal Maulalo Cortez, a rifleman from Company G, 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, said he likes the training and believes it should be utilized by more units.

“When you’re over there [Afghanistan], that’s what most of the operations are, is motorized,” said the Temecula, Calif., native. “Any unit who wants to come through here I would defiantly recommend it. It’s a great program, and they teach you quite a bit while you’re here.”

Captain Paul Tomlinson, a Marine training with ATG, said the course offers practice to those who have done it before, but also helps newer Marines mentally prepare for their first deployment.

“Some of these Marines haven’t had this opportunity yet,” said the Indianapolis native. “You can tell they’re new to it, but us older guys have been playing a mentor role along with the instructors, to get them up to par.”


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