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Lance Cpl. Marcellous Mason, supply administrator, 3rd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, has been producing rap music since he was in sixth grade. He uses his lyrics as a form of preaching to spread the word about his beliefs.(Official Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Levi Schultz/Released)

Photo by Lance Cpl. Levi Schultz

What I've Learned: Marcellous Mason

18 Sep 2015 | Lance Cpl. Levi Schultz Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms

Lance Cpl. Marcellous Mason, supply administrator, 3rd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, has been producing rap music since he was in sixth grade. He uses his lyrics as a form of preaching to spread the word about his beliefs.



Before I started making music I used to preach. I felt that music was a good way to get the word out because people love to listen to music. If people listen to my music, then they are listening to preaching.



I like to make music that motivates people. I would make songs of a different genre but I can’t sing.



Music uplifts people in a way. You don’t know what people are going through and music can help them bond and get through hard times.



I believe that my music can help people realize that life is short and that things will get better.



My religion is Christianity. Through my own research I’ve come to believe in Jesus Christ. I feel that he reveals himself to people in different ways than you can see with your eyes.



I’ve been in the Marine Corps for just over a year now.

In my time in the Marine Corps, I’ve built bonds with my fellow Marines. Each Marine in a company or platoon knows what the others have to go through.



There is always that rivalry between west and east coast Marines, and Marines from different battalions or platoons. In the end, we are all Marines and will work together to accomplish the mission.



There is also rivalry between the Marines and the other branches of service. In the same way, services members have a bond and can work together when the time comes.

My family consists of my mother, father, three brothers and two sisters. I have a twin brother who is a pastor.



I moved around a lot throughout Alabama growing up. One thing I noticed growing up in Alabama is that people say sir or ma’am to show respect. The Marine Corps is similar in that we use our customs and courtesies to be respectful and professional.



Before I joined the Marine Corps, I used to cook everyday with my mother. While we would cook every meal, my specialty is breakfast foods. In Alabama, my grandfather would also show me different things to cook.



Drawing is another way for me to express my beliefs. I noticed that I was very artistic and that I loved to draw. Many of my drawings have hidden meanings and symbols.

While in my [military occupation specialty] school I received the motivation award. I don’t know why but I seem to motivate people. I like to keep a positive attitude because it helps those around me stay motivated.



I joined the Marine Corps for the challenge. A Marine Corps’ recruiter came to me and asked me if I would accept the challenge. I took it and it certainly has been difficult.

Before boot camp, I never knew anything about the military because none of my family members are in the service.



If I get out of the military, I will be able to put the skills I’ve learned to use in my resume. There are a lot of little things that go into doing your job in the military and they help you when you are looking for a job.



The most important thing in my life right now is my career. I have high hopes for the future and would like to be a sergeant major someday.

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Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms